The brilliance of discovery

Sirigen Inc.

Sirigen technology

In 2000 the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the discovery of a unique class of conducting polymer materials which are revolutionizing the electronic and display industries and are the foundation of Sirigen’s technology.

These patented chemistries allow the creation of specifically tailored polymers which can serve as “molecular antennae”, collecting and transferring increased energy to standard fluorescent labels bound to nucleic acid probes and antibodies. Implementing these materials into conventional testing dramatically intensifies resulting detection signals by up to 100 times, offering sensitivity orders of magnitude beyond the physical limitations of existing methods and reagents.

Nucleic acid assays and Immunology assays

Signal Amplification

Signal Amplification

Sirigen polymer chains can be considered as a collection of optical segments. Each segment in the polymer chain is capable of absorbing light, resulting in materials that can have extremely large extinction coefficients (or probability of absorbing photons of light).

As a result of the electronic delocalization inherent to these materials, energy has the ability to move or migrate along these extended chains. Thus all the light “harvested” by the polymers can either be channeled to a closely associated fluorescent acceptor of lower energy through a FRET process or emitted as fluorescence by the polymer itself if no dye is used. It is this collective, “molecular antenna” like behavior that forms the foundation of the Sirigen technology and intellectual property base. The diagram below represents the central concepts.

Nucleic acid assays and Immunology assays